Oddment

My Tumblr is basically my mind palace, filled with all things Sherlock, Doctor Who, Nerdfighteria, and Harry Potter.

It also includes some Cabin Pressure, Avengers, Elementary, and Merlin as well as inspiration, creativity, humor, and randomness.

DFTBA!

These people are the reason I get nothing done.
Posts tagged "my stuff"

In wake of this news, I feel like I could make a really good Patronus right now.

Asker patronusbutt Asks:
hello :D i found your url in the sherlock holmes museum :D <3
thefrailtyofgeniusisaudience thefrailtyofgeniusisaudience Said:

WOOO SOMEONE FOUND IT I FEEL SO ACCOMPLISHED

(I’m publishing this so I can go back and remember this accomplishment; For those of you reading this I put my tumblr on the bulletin board (with an I Believe in Sherlock Holmes message) in the Sherlock Holmes museum in London AND IT WAS FOUND YAAAAY).

Thank you SO MUCH for telling me this, it totally made my day (I’m also really sorry it took me so long to reply).

fandomacepilot:

bossanovabyss:

areallyusefulblog:

fandomsandfeminism:

fandomacepilot:

The first part of my psychology class extra credit powerpoint, the part on Doctor Who. (there was a thing so I edited and reposted)

~Love it~

I’m thinking of writing my own article on this as well, when I finish with Amy Pond/RIver Song/Clara.

I think the problem is that Steven Moffat doesn’t exactly know what makes a “strong female character.”

Aside from the lover/mother thing being a running trend with his ladies (aside from the three mentioned above, we also have Nancy in The Empty Child/Doctor Dances and Madame de Pompadour in The Girl in the Fireplace—Sally Sparrow is about the only exception since her motivation wasn’t centered around a boy, though even she had two love interests in the span of her one episode, with Lawrence Nightingale and the other dude), it seems to me like Moffat thinks “sassy, mouths off a lot” is what makes a female character strong. Like, as long as they have attitude, then they’re strong characters.

And I’ve noticed that in the fandom, too. When some friends and I were discussing the problems I had with Amy’s introduction in “The Eleventh Hour” (namely, the fact that while Rose, Martha, and Donna all actively helped to save the day in their introductory episodes, Amy quite literally “saved the day” by falling asleep and having the Doctor coach her through it—so in other words, instead of her helping him as the other companions did, he helped her), I had numerous people tell me things like:

  • “No, Amy’s strong, she doesn’t take any of the Doctor’s shit!”
  • “She tells him off all the time.” 
  • “It’s Amy’s choice whether to be with the Doctor or Rory!!”

And that … that’s not really very comforting, because not only have all of the Doctor’s companions stood up and mouthed off to him when he’s crossed the line (out of the New Who companions of RTD’s era, the ones who argued the least were actually Wilfred Mott and Captain Jack Harkness; Rose, Martha, Donna, and Mickey all gave the Doctor earfuls plenty of times), but there’s more to being a strong character—and a strong female character, at that—than just being sassy. Telling the Doctor that he’s being an assface every now and then doesn’t make you a strong character. It makes you a character with a smart mouth, but when every single one of the other female characters this man has written has had a sassy mouth (Nancy, Reinette, Sally Sparrow, etc), that starts to stand out less and less as time goes on.

Oh, and before we go further? Being really violent doesn’t make you a strong character, either. Just because you have a gun and know how to use it doesn’t mean that you’re strong.

So what makes a strong character, especially a female one, in my opinion? Well …

  • Having a life outside of male characters, for one—especially the main one. Please raise your hand if you have ever criticized Bella Swan because her life revolved around Edward Cullen and/or (depending on the book) Jacob Black. Now put your hand down if you don’t think it’s a problem that the most important people in Amy’s life are the Doctor and Rory Williams. Sure, Amy isn’t just a blank slate character, but her parents are imagined back into existence and she doesn’t even seem to care. They don’t play a very integral role in the plot at all, even as side characters, and neither does the aunt that gets a mention once or twice, that she supposedly lives with as a kid. Frick, at least Charlie Swan has some key appearances in the Twilight series. Amy’s parents and aunt get shown briefly at her wedding, I believe, and then not really again after, because the only characters Moffat felt were relevant to Amy’s story were the Doctor (main male character), Rory (boyfriend/husband), and River (daughter). As for her job, well, she’s a kissogram. And that’s fine if that’s what she chooses to do, but clearly it’s not something she was passionate about as she later drops it to be a model (unlike Martha with her medical degree, as she later uses that in UNIT—and sure, that’s not what she was originally going to do, but it’s an understandable leap considering what she went through during the Year That Never Was). Meanwhile, you have River, and she does have parents—but her parents are Amy and Rory, who are with the Doctor, so that doesn’t help her have a life outside of the Doctor, either. She does later become a professor, but again, that’s due to the influence the Doctor has had on her. And then you have Clara, who is heavily played up as a love interest to the Doctor (which I mean, I ship them as well, so I’m not complaining too much there), whose parents are dead, and who has some kids that she nannies. So she’s a bit better, and it seems like Moffat’s learning, and then you learn that—as mentioned above, her entire existence hinges on her saving the Doctor. She exists to save him. Her life, in other words, revolves around him. These ladies’ lives revolve around the men in them. We almost had a winner with Clara, and then lost it. And that’s a problem to me.

And before I go further, let me just say that this is a problem not only for the lady characters, but also for the supporting cast, and the supporting cast is important to tell a fulfilling narrative. Rose Tyler came packaged with her mother, Jackie Tyler, and her kinda-sorta boyfriend Mickey Smith (best friend Mickey, really, if we’re going to be honest). Jackie and Mickey gave Rose a reason to return to London periodically. They shaped her character because although she no longer had a shop job to return to, she felt incredibly guilty for making her mother worry for a year and for making Mickey go through all those police questioning sessions, and it was clear that these three people cared for each other dearly. Rose did choose to keep traveling, but it’s very, very clear that she intends on keeping better contact and that she’s going to come back for visits (which she does). 

And on top of that, Jackie and Mickey got some of the best character development in New Who’s run, imo. Jackie went from being an overprotective, suspicious woman who didn’t care for change and wasn’t open to the Doctor’s world at all to being a fiercely protective, loyal, brave woman who was willing to hop across dimensions if it meant keeping her daughter safe. Mickey went from being a somewhat cowardly boy who was complacent with his mediocre life to being a courageous, clever man who was willing to travel the world if it meant defending it from any threat. Seasons one and two were great not only because of Rose, but because of the development we saw in the side characters of Jackie and Mickey as well.

And we got Martha with her medical degree and her family (and her family played a pivotal role in the dealings of season three), and Donna with her mother and her grandfather, Wilfred Mott, who becomes a companion himself. Rose, Martha, and Donna were not only fleshed out as real, breathing characters because of their families, jobs, and lives, but their families helped flesh out and impact the narrative and make the story more emotional and compelling.

By removing that element, Moffat is not only making Amy, River, and Clara suffer, but he’s making the narrative suffer as a whole. I think that this is not only because he thinks sassy = strong without anything else added, but also because while Russell T. Davies focused the story of Who on the companions, Steven Moffat focuses the story of Who on the Doctor. RTD’s Doctors got full arcs, yes, but seasons one and two are definitely about Rose and her story. Season three is about Martha. Season four is about Donna, and the End of Time is about Donna and Wilf to an extent as well, as much as it’s about the Doctor’s impending regeneration. Russell T Davies fleshed out his companions and made them people because they had stories to tell, because the Doctor—for all his brilliance—was not the hero of these tales. (Also note that while he didn’t get to do quite the same for Jack in DW, that’s what Torchwood is for.) The companions were the stars. The companions were the heroes. The companions look like giants to the Doctor because they are the reason for the show. 

It’s not so in Moffat’s Who. In Moffat’s Who, it’s about the Doctor’s pain, the Doctor’s tragedy, how the Doctor deals with this and how he experiences that, and what the companions offer him. The “mystery wrapped in an engima” that they are, riddles for him to solve or lovers for him to caress in scenes of sassy flirtation. They are side characters to his story, whereas it can be easily argued that it was the other way around in RTD’s era. And I think that’s where the biggest difference comes in.

So … this was a long, rambling mess that got away from my original point, but I think this new epiphany still stands. Moffat writes the Doctor as the most important person in the universe. RTD wrote the companions as if they were the most important in the universe. YMMV on which is better, but, well … I think we know where my opinion stands on this.

And I still maintain that Moffat’s writing suffers in direct response to his approach.

*appreciative, highly impressed applause*

Damn. That commentary fully expresses a lot of the things I feel about Moffat’s Who, and does it really well. I am doing a slide on what Moffat thinks is a ‘strong female character’ and I could never put my feelings into words half as well as this. I salute you, that was a brilliant piece of commentary.

I agree with so much of what is in the powerpoint and written above, but in light of the finale (Spoilers for The Name of The Doctor coming up, you’ve been warned) I think a second glance at Clara might be warranted. 

It was said above that Clara’s ”entire existence hinges on her saving the Doctor. She exists to save him. Her life, in other words, revolves around him.” It definitely seemed this way at first, with Asylum and the christmas special and what not. But as we’ve found out, the Claras in those places aren’t exactly the Clara that we’ve seen traveling with the Doctor. They’re (as it was so well phrased in this brilliant commentary that I will be referencing) “copies.” They’re not meant to be fully rotund, fleshed out, and developed characters.

As it was so eloquently put in that commentary I linked, Clara jumped in The Doctor’s timeline and created those copies for the sole purpose of saving The Doctor. Their purpose, their existence is to save The Doctor - not the real Clara who dived into the timeline. (Now you might be saying that this is basically the same thing and still an issue but I beg you to go read that link it’s explained so much better than I could ever explain it).

Clara was not “literally created to save The Doctor” - Clara’s copies were. And it was Clara who made the decision to create these copies, in the face of The Doctor telling her not to go jump in the timeline and save him. 

In the finale it’s revealed that “impossible girl” Clara is actually just a normal girl who made the decision to be extraordinary - she wasn’t created or born with the purpose of saving The Doctor, she decides to do so, on her own. And I suppose I’ll add that this decision wasn’t made out of passionate/romantic love for The Doctor (at least, I don’t think so. River was, after all, right there.). Personally, I found it sort of nice to see The Doctor being the damsel in distress and his companion being the knight in shining armor saving the universe. 

Clara doesn’t need The Doctor to save her or The Doctor to live - even her copies don’t need The Doctor to save them. Quite frankly I’m sort of confused on how Clara needs The Doctor to save her but then is the one who saves The Doctor (I see the problem inherent in her purpose being to save The Doctor, but I’ve addressed this above). Part of being friends is helping out your friend and being helped equally in return, and in my opinion the relationship between Clara and The Doctor is one of equals. She saves him sometimes (through her own decisions, not because it was what she was created for), he saves her sometimes, and they have fun adventures. Clara’s live doesn’t revolve around The Doctor and saving him - she isn’t constantly traveling with The Doctor (she lives a life at home with the kids she watches), she didn’t just hop aboard and go sightseeing in his snogbox with no questions asked, and if I remember correctly she mouths off to him as well (in said finale I do believe she gets on his case about him saying that she shouldn’t exist but I could be wrong). And as the narrative continues, her life gets more fleshed out (we learn about her backstory, we learn about the kids she watches, and I’m sure we’ll learn more).

In my opinion, I think in the finale Clara sort of becomes the hero. She shows her strength by jumping into The Doctor’s timeline (without being prodded to do so by anyone) and saving him - saving him not though some ultimate fate/destiny/existence/purpose but with the same courage and kindness that Rose saved Nine all those episodes ago. 

(If any of that sounded too critical or mean, I’m really sorry because it isn’t meant to. It’s rather late as I write this and I’m sure it’s lacking in many points and is full of grammatical errors. I really like what is written above in the commentary and the powerpoint, and I think it’s great we can have these awesome discussions in the fandom).

(via eleanor-oswald)

doctorwho:

thefrailtyofgeniusisaudience:

I rounded up my Dalek friend to take a picture with my Doctor Who mug, and this little Adipose guy snuck in there as well.

I’m currently interrogating him to see if his friends are the ones running the brilliant doctorwho Tumblr. No word yet. I shall bribe him with Jammie Dodgers.

*:・゚✧ ゜・。。・゜☆゜・。。・゜☆ ゜・。。・゜☆ ゜・。。・゜

You are the stars of the Doctor Who Tumblr so we want your autograph. (✿◡‿◡)


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We’re going to take everybody’s posts and turn them into a collage poster for the Doctor Who Tumblr office. ヽ(゜∇゜)ノ

Have a question about the poster project? Check our FAQ! (◕ ◡ ◕)

Deadline is May 17!

(ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧*:・゚✧

OH MY GALLIFREY THE DOCTORWHO TUMBLR REBLOGGED ME.

MY LIFE IS COMPLETE.

I rounded up my Dalek friend to take a picture with my Doctor Who mug, and this little Adipose guy snuck in there as well.

I’m currently interrogating him to see if his friends are the ones running the brilliant doctorwho Tumblr. No word yet. I shall bribe him with Jammie Dodgers.

On my english class’s facebook group someone posted a crash course video about the great gatsby (while cramming for the AP test) and it turned into a john green appreciation post in the comments.

Arthur will rise,

and school’s just begun.

Hogwarts will be there,

to welcome you home.

The world’s still looked after,

Sam and Dean will still run.

Castiel will follow,

and times will be fun.

The Doctor’s still there,

and Sherlock will come.

Clara’s new to the TARDIS,

John won’t stay undone.

So just you keep waiting,

the show isn’t done.

Put your chin up,

keep smiling on.

 

(in response to this)

Whovian Wednesday you say?

WHY DID I REWATCH DOOMSDAY

THAT WAS A STUPID IDEA

So I reblogged a ton of mishapocalypse stuff to my other blog because I don’t care if people unfollow me there but then I realized - that was the blog I told this girl at school was mine (after she asked for my tumblr and I didn’t want to give her my main fandom one over here).

I really hope she doesn’t go on tumblr for april fools or I am going to have a lot of explaining to do.

  • Sherlock: John, I got the milk?
  • John: Really? Fantastic!
  • Sherlock: April fools!
  • John: ...